Crime

What’s your cyber risk profile?

Get Safe Online WeekWe’ve just carried out some new independent research, surveying 2,000 people, from which one of the main findings is that cybercrime is getting personal – with one in five victims believing that they were specifically targeted by fraudsters. We’ve collated the data and put together this infographic, depicting statistics around habits, threats, issues and opinions split by gender and age groups. It makes some very interesting reading. (more…)

Support scams now target Mac customers

Swindlers impersonate Apple service that remotely accesses user desktops.

For years, scammers claiming that they’re “calling from Windows” have dialed up Microsoft customers and done their best to trick them into parting with their money or installing malicious wares. Now, the swindlers are turning their sights on Mac users.

Researchers at antivirus provider Malwarebytes spotted a Web-based campaign that attempts to trick OS X and iOS users into thinking there’s something wrong with their devices. The ruse starts with a pop-up window that’s designed to look like an official OS notification. “Critical Security Warning!” it says. “Your Device (iPad, iPod, iPhone) is infected with a malicious adward [sic] attack.” It goes on to provide a phone number people can call to receive tech support.

Read the full article: Ars Technica 21 October 2015

Cybercrime is getting personal

Get Safe Online WeekOne in five victims of cybercrime think they were specifically targeted by fraudsters.

  • Only 38% of victims of cybercrimes think it was down to bad luck
  • Over a third of victims felt vulnerable following the attack
  • UK public lost £286 million to cybercrimes in the last 12 months
  • ‘It’s Always Personal’ theme for Get Safe Online Week 2015

(more…)

Rogue Traders claim to be Trading Standards

Say No to Rogue TradersKCC Trading Standards has received reports of rogue traders impersonating Trading Standards officers to obtain money.

Last week a resident in Canterbury opened their door to a man wearing a uniform and speaking with an Irish accent. The man claimed to be investigating work done to their driveway and asked for a phone number. Later that same day a man telephoned the resident and told them they had to pay £3500 to the court which they would receive back with their compensation. (more…)

Six top tips to keep it personal

GSO-Week_Webpage_banner1. Don’t publish your date of birth in your profile or highlight your birthday in posts or tweets. Why not? Your date of birth is very useful information for a fraudster, hacker or identity thief.

2. Remember that if you use the names of pets, family members, a sports team or other ‘favourite’ things in your passwords or memorable words, and reveal your likes and dislikes online, you may be handing a criminal clues to your login details.

3. Don’t reveal your passport number, driving licence number or any other official details to anyone unless you’re absolutely sure that they are authentic, and that providing these details is necessary. For example, if a prospective employer or agency asks you for a passport scan as proof

of ability to work in the UK, check their authenticity.

4. Don’t get fooled into revealing your PINs or passwords in response to an email, social networking post, text or phone call, however convincing it seems that the request is from your bank, the police or another real organisation.

5. Don’t write down or store login details electronically or on paper, where there’s a chance they could be found.

6. Never open an email attachment unless you’re 100% certain of who sent it, or what it is. This is because it could contain a virus that steals your personal information. Even an email that seems to come from a friend or colleague could have been sent by a virus on their device. If in doubt, ask the person you believe sent it before opening anything

Kent County Council phone scam

KCC LogoKent County Council (KCC) have received a number of reports of scam phone calls from people claiming to be from KCC. The caller asks if you have contacted the NHS about a recent accident you, or a member of your family has had.

The telephone number used to make these calls is 03000 41 40 00, which was a telephone number for KCC. Please be aware that the calls are not being made by Kent County Council, this number is being replicated by caller ID spoofing equipment as part of a scam or hoax and is no longer in use.

KCC are concerned that residents may be asked for payment or information such as bank details.

If you receive one of these scam telephone calls please report it to Kent Trading Standards or telephone the Citizens Advice consumer service on 03454 04 05 06.

Kent County Council 22nd September 2015

Parcel Mule Scam

People are being targeted to become “Parcel Mules” as part of a reshipping scam, which results in them handling stolen goods and losing out financially.

Victims are predominantly recruited through job advertisements and dating websites. They are persuaded to have items delivered to their addresses, and to pay for postage before sending the items elsewhere. Victims are contacted through Freelancer websites and invited to become a “Freight Forwarder” as an employment opportunity. The work is advertised as processing packages and forwarding them to clients. (more…)

Windows 10 upgrade scams

If you have received an email with an attachment that claims to be the Windows 10 upgrade, or have received a call offering to help walk you through the Windows 10 upgrade, please do not open the attachment or follow their instructions.

Unfortunately, cybercriminals are trying to capitalize on the great momentum of Windows 10, with nefarious email, web, and phone scams directing our customers to install ransomware and other malware.

Windows 10 is a free upgrade offered by Microsoft which you can take advantage of by reserving your free copy online, or by visiting a Microsoft Store near you to secure free upgrade services.

Microsoft does not initiate calls to customers to assist with Windows 10 installation or technical support, nor do we send emails with installation files attached.  If you have been contacted by telephone or if you have received such emails with attached installation files, consider these fraudulent and do not share your personal information or open the attachment.

Read More on Microsoft Support