Health

NHS Test and Trace

NHS Test and Trace service is now in operation.
You may be contacted by the Service if:
▪️You have tested positive for Coronavirus or
▪️You have been in contact with a person who has tested positive for Coronavirus.

Be aware of scammers taking advantage of the launch of the service.

For accurate detailed information about the service go to
https://www.nhs.uk/…/coronavirus-c…/testing-for-coronavirus/

The NHS Test and Trace service will contact you by email, text or phone.
Text messages will come from the NHS. Calls will come from 0300 0135000.
Children under 18 will be contacted by phone wherever possible and asked for their parent or guardian’s permission to continue the call.

If you have tested positive for Coronavirus:

You’ll be asked to sign in to the NHS Test and Trace contact tracing website at https://contact-tracing.phe.gov.uk.

On the contact tracing website, you’ll be asked for information including:
▪️your name, date of birth and postcode
▪️if you live with other people
▪️any places you’ve been recently, such as a workplace or school
▪️names and contact details of any people you were in close contact with in the 48 hours before your symptoms started (if you know these details)
If you cannot use the contact tracing website, you’ll be asked for this information over the phone.

The NHS Test and Trace service will not:

▪️ask for bank details or payments
▪️ask for details of any other accounts, such as social media
▪️ask you to set up a password or PIN number over the phone
▪️ask you to call a premium rate number, such as those starting 09 or 087

Do not click links in texts or emails
Do not press 1 if you are telephoned

Organ donation opt-out

Today, a new system of consent for organ and tissue donation in England has gone live. Under the new system, known as ‘opt out’ or ‘deemed consent’, people over 18 years of age in England will now be considered to have agreed to donate their organs and tissue after death, except where they made a decision to opt out.

Donating organs will remain a personal decision

While the new system is now live, people will continue to be able to record their decision to opt out at any point and the simplest way to do so is on the NHS Organ Donation website.

It’s important that everyone takes the time to discuss their choices on donation with their families, whatever their preference may be.  Get the facts about organ donation to help you decide

The new system comes with necessary safeguards

Children below 18 years, people who have been ordinary residents for less than 12 months in England and people who lacked capacity for a significant time, will be excluded. 

Earlier in the year the Department of Health and Social Care announced a further safeguard, following our 12-week public consultation the previous year. This will ensure that the new system will only apply to routine transplants, to help those waiting for a life-saving or life-enhancing transplant.

Novel and rare transplants will be excluded from deemed consent when they become available in the UK. 

Wearing a face covering does not protect you.

The UK Government is now recommending the use of face coverings in enclosed spaces where social distances might not be maintained.

If you can, wear a face covering in an enclosed space where social distancing isn’t possible and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet. This is most relevant for short periods indoors in crowded areas, for example, on public transport or in some shops.

Evidence suggests that wearing a face covering does not protect you.

However, if you are infected but have not yet developed symptoms, it may provide some protection for others you come into close contact with.

Face coverings do not replace social distancing.

If you have symptoms of COVID-19 (cough and/or high temperature), you and your household must isolate at home: wearing a face covering does not change this.

A face covering is not the same as the surgical masks or respirators used by healthcare and other workers as part of personal protective equipment. These should continue to be reserved for those who need them to protect against risks in their workplace, such as health and care workers, and those in industrial settings, like those exposed to dust hazards.

Face coverings should not be used by children under the age of 2 or those who may find it difficult to manage them correctly. For example, primary age children unassisted, or those with respiratory conditions.

Wearing a face covering

It is important to use face coverings properly and wash your hands before putting them on and taking them off.

A cloth face covering should cover your mouth and nose while allowing you to breathe comfortably. It can be as simple as a scarf or bandana that ties behind the head.

Wash your hands or use hand sanitiser before putting it on and after taking it off and after use. Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth at all times and store used face coverings in a plastic bag until you have an opportunity to wash them.

Do not touch the front of the face covering, or the part of the face covering that has been in contact with your mouth and nose. Once removed, make sure you clean any surfaces the face covering has touched.

You should wash a face covering regularly. It can go in with other laundry, using your normal detergent.

When wearing a face covering, take care to tuck away any loose ends.

Home made face coverings

You can make face-coverings at home. The key thing is it should cover the mouth and nose.

Instructions for making face coverings:

Cabinet Office, 11 May 2020
www.gov.uk/government/publications/staying-safe-outside-your-home/staying-safe-outside-your-home
Public Health England, 11 May 2020
www.gov.uk/government/publications/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering/how-to-wear-and-make-a-cloth-face-covering

Public spaces / outdoor activities / exercise

There will be a limited number of things you can do from Wednesday 13th May that you cannot do now:

  • spend time outdoors – for example sitting and enjoying the fresh air, picnicking, or sunbathing
  • meet one other person from a different household outdoors – following social distancing guidelines
  • exercise outdoors as often as you wish – following social distancing guidelines
  • use outdoor sports courts or facilities, such as a tennis or basketball court, or golf course – with members of your household, or one other person while staying 2 metres apart
  • go to a garden centre

At all times, should continue to observe social distancing guidelines when you are outside your home, including ensuring you are 2 metres away from anyone outside your household. As with before, you cannot:

  • visit friends and family in their homes
  • exercise in an indoor sports court, gym or leisure centre, or go swimming in a public pool
  • use an outdoor gym or playground
  • visit a private or ticketed attraction
  • gather in a group of more than two (excluding members of your own household), except for a few specific exceptions set out in law (for work, funerals, house moves, supporting the vulnerable, in emergencies and to fulfil legal obligations)

If you are showing coronavirus symptoms, or if you or any of your household are self-isolating, you should stay at home – this is critical to staying safe and saving lives.

Use of masks

With advice from the Scottish Government that citizens should wear face coverings in some situations we give information on the benefits of masks in the community.

We have reproduced below an extract from the World Health Organisation document ‘Advice on the use of masks in the context of COVID-19

In summary:

  • There is limited evidence that wearing of masks by people who have Covid-19 asymptomatically may prevent them spreading the virus to others.
  • There is no evidence that wearing a mask (whether medical or other types) by healthy persons in the wider community setting, can prevent them from infection with COVID-19.
  • The use of medical masks in the community may create a false sense of security, leading to potentially less adherence to proven preventive measures such as physical distancing and hand hygiene.
  • For any type of mask, appropriate use and disposal are essential to ensure that they are effective and to avoid any increase in transmission.
  • Medical masks should be reserved for health care workers.
(more…)

For parents

A special COVID-19 message

When your child is ill or injured it is very difficult to decide if/when to call your child’s GP, NHS 111 or go the Accident and Emergency Department (A&E). While the governmen tis asking everyone to slay an home, it can be confusing to know what to do. Here is some guidance around what to do if your child shows any of the following symptoms or signs.

For advice on COVID-19 and chlldhood illnesses/injuries visit www.NHS.UK

image006

You should go to A&E and/or call 999 immediately if

Appearance
  • Pale/mottled/ashen/blue colour
  • Collapsed/unresponsive/loss of conciousness
  • No obvious pulse or heartbeat
  • Severe allergic reaction
Behaviour
  • Extreme irritability/pain/sleepiness
    (can be woken but falls asleep immediately)
  • Seizure/jerking movements/fit
Breathing
  • Sucking in and out between ribs
  • Flaring nostrils
  • Extremely fast breathing
  • Unusually noisy breathing
Other
  • Bleeding from an injury that doesn’t stop after 10 minutes of pressure
  • Fever with a stiff neck

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You should go to A&E if

Appearance
  • Dizziness/feeling faint
  • Rash that does not fade when you press it
Behaviour
  • Severe tummy pain
Other
  • Burn
  • Possibie broken bone
Other
  • Swallowed foreign objects
    (especially magnets/batteries)
  • Temperature higher than 38°C
    in a baby younger than 3 months old
  • Your Child has special health care needs
    and you have a plan that tells you to go to A&E
  • Feels abnormally cold to touch
  • Expressing suicidal/significant self-harm thoughts
  • Head injury

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You should call your GP if

Appearance
  • Mild/moderate allergic reaction (known or suspected)
  • New rash that fades when you press on it
  • Mild irritability/sleepier than normal
  • Moderate tummy pain
  • Vomiting and diarrhoea
  • Not passed urine for more than 12 hours
Breathing
  • Wheezing/fast breathing
Other
  • Temperature >39°C [age 3-‘I2 months]
  • Temperature over 38°C for 5 days or more
  • Accidentai overdose of medication or other substances
  • Ear pain for more than 2 days
  • Emotional distress (where your child can’t be reassured)

image002

You should use 111 online or call 111 if:

Appearance
  • Pink eyes/red eyes
Behaviour
  • Ear pain for less than 2 days
  • Mild tummy pain
Breathing
  • Cough
  • Runny nose
Other
  • Temperature over 38°C for less than 5 days

Designed by primary and secondary care clinicians from Barts Health NHS Trust and East London Health and Care Partnership

Coronovirus update

You will have seen/heard that the Government is planning to ask those over 70 to stop social contact for a prolonged period.

The Minister for Health has emphasised that the Government have not yet decided when this period should start. Starting too early will prolong the period that over 70s need to ‘self-isolate’.

Those with heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic lung disease and some cancers may be more suscetible to more severe affects of the virus and should take extra care to protect themselves.

For more advice on Coronavirus see our earlier post

Coronovirus latest advice

The Prime Minister, supported by the Chief Scientific Advisor and the Chief Medical Officer announced new measures to limit the impact of COVID-19 (Coronavirus) this afternoon.

No new restrictions on events were announced. Schools are expected to continue to open as normal, unless advised otherwise by local public health officers.

Stay at home guidance for coronavirus symptoms

The most common symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) are recent onset of:

  • new continuous cough and/or
  • high temperature

For most people, coronavirus (COVID-19) will be a mild infection

  • if you have symptoms of coronavirus infection (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home and do not leave your house for 7 days from when your symptoms started. (See Ending Isolation section below for more information)
  • this action will help protect others in your community whilst you are infectious.
  • plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home.
  • ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home.
  • stay at least 2 metres (about 3 steps) away from other people in your home whenever possible.
  • sleep alone, if that is possible.
  • wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water.
  • stay away from vulnerable individuals such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions as much as possible.
  • you do not need to call NHS111 to go into self-isolation. If your symptoms worsen during home isolation or are no better after 7 days contact NHS 111 online. If you have no internet access, you should call NHS 111.

Those self-isolating with mild symptoms will not be tested.

Continue to good hygiene practice

The Chief Medical Officer emphasised that the most important thing for individuals to continue to use good hygiene practice previously recommended.

Do
  • wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds
  • always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
Don’t
  • do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

NHS
https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Have your say on how health services are commissioned

STP Logo

Transforming health and social care in Kent and Medway

Opens: 11 September 2019
Closes: 23 September 2019

The NHS in Kent and Medway is seeking your views on how health services are commissioned (planned and purchased).

At the moment we are one of eight GP-led clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) across Kent and Medway, responsible for planning and spending the health budget to meet local needs. 

Although we and the other CCGs have much to be proud of over the last six years, the GPs who chair the CCGs, including our clinical chair, now believe the CCGs should merge to form a new single clinical commissioning group for Kent and Medway, which would also be led by GPs.

A single Kent and Medway CCG would:  

  • provide a ‘bird’s eye view’ of health priorities for people across Kent and Medway based on a detailed understanding of local health needs, so that care can be planned effectively for everyone
  • identify where challenging health problems can be shared and tackled
  • allow the consistent commissioning of some services – such as cancer, mental health, children’s services and prevention – across Kent and Medway
  • focus on the health, wellbeing and care needs of the whole population
  • reduce management and administration costs across Kent and Medway.

There was a survey earlier this summer to get people’s initial views on the suggested changes. They include GP practices working much more closely together, and all the services in given areas (such as east Kent) joining up care for local people. Building on the feedback from that survey, we’d now like to find out your views about the specific proposal to create a single clinical commissioning group (CCG) for Kent and Medway.

In June, we published a leaflet Helping local people live their best life which set outs more details. This included a survey which ran until August, to get people’s initial views on the suggested changes. They include GP practices working much more closely together, and all the services in given areas (such as east Kent) joining up care for local people.

Building on the feedback from that survey, we’d now like to find out your views about the specific proposal to create a single clinical commissioning group (CCG) for Kent and Medway.

The survey is open until 23 September. Please complete it and share with your friends, colleagues and family as your views are important to us.

NHS Ashford Clinical Commissioning Group
11 September 2019
https://www.ashfordccg.nhs.uk/news/blog/?blogpost=11417

Asthma workshop

Do you want to have your say about new asthma services?

KSSAHSN* want to hear from you about your own experiences of healthcare and think about how technology could support you in managing and improving your health and well-being.

This workshop will be one of several, looking at new ways to improve the lives of people living with one or more conditions including asthma, cardiovascular disease, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes.

  • Thursday 26th September 2019,
  • 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • The Kings Studio,
    Aylesford Village Community Centre,
    25 Forstal Road, Aylesford, Kent, ME20 7AU

If you would like more information or to book a place, please contact:

  • designandlearningcentre @kent.gov.uk
  • 07920873682

* Kent Surrey Sussex Academic Health Science Network