Health

Asthma workshop

Do you want to have your say about new asthma services?

KSSAHSN* want to hear from you about your own experiences of healthcare and think about how technology could support you in managing and improving your health and well-being.

This workshop will be one of several, looking at new ways to improve the lives of people living with one or more conditions including asthma, cardiovascular disease, Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes.

  • Thursday 26th September 2019,
  • 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
  • The Kings Studio,
    Aylesford Village Community Centre,
    25 Forstal Road, Aylesford, Kent, ME20 7AU

If you would like more information or to book a place, please contact:

  • designandlearningcentre @kent.gov.uk
  • 07920873682

* Kent Surrey Sussex Academic Health Science Network

Survey: website for adults with Type 2 diabetes

Creating a new website for adults with Type 2 diabetes

NHS England
Closes: 2 September 2019

NHS England and Improvement, Public Health England and Diabetes UK are launching a new online self-management website for adults living with type 2 diabetes.

The website will:

  • Provide education and information about type 2 diabetes and its treatments
  • Offer content on managing your mood and stress
  • Help with adopting and maintaining healthy behaviours (e.g. diet, exercise).

NHS England would love to have your help in making the website as useful as possible.

This survey will take less than five minutes to complete and your answers will help to shape the new website.

Your responses will be completely anonymous and there are no right or wrong answers. They just want the benefit of your opinions and experiences.

Take part in the survey here

Survey on services for children and young people

Transforming health and social care in Kent and Medway

Opens: 10 August 2019
Closes: 23 August 2019

The NHS and local councils want to transform health and care services for children and young people and are calling on local people to get involved and help.

A recent Healthwatch survey showed children and young people in Kent and Medway want their voice to be heard when local services are designed, and the NHS has launched a survey to enable this. Dr Bob Bowes, a GP in Tunbridge Wells and Clinical Chair for Kent and Medway Sustainability and Transformation Partnership said: “We want local children, young people and their parents and carers to help us design services which are fit for the future to give children and young people the best start in life.

“They really can make a difference and we want suggestions for how we can improve.

“We need your help to tell us what already works well in the current system, and what doesn’t.”

The survey, which is open to children and young people from birth to 25 and their parents and carers, will help the NHS and local councils decide the priorities for future improvements to children’s services. The survey takes around 10 minutes to fill in and will close on Friday, 23 August.

There is a version for:

The NHS is keen to get feedback from children and young people of all ages as well as their parents and carers.

Kent County Council and Medway Council are working together with the NHS to improve services.

Cllr Josie Iles, Medway Council’s Portfolio Holder for Children’s Services, said: “We are pleased to be working with partners to further develop a collective understanding of the needs of children and young people in Kent and Medway.”

Consultation: Organs excluded from the opt-out organ donation

Opt-out organ donation: organs and tissues excluded from the new system

Department of Health and Social Care

Opened: 29 April 2019
Closes: 22 July 2019

This consultation is to ask you if the government is excluding the right organs and tissues from opt-out organ donation. We would like you to answer five questions about what you think should happen.

The government recently passed a law to change the rules for organ donation in England from 2020. The law introduced a system commonly called “opt-out” or “deemed consent”.

From 2020, everyone in England over the age of 18 will be considered to be in favour of donating their organs and tissue after death unless they:

  • have said they do not want to donate (opted out)
  • have appointed someone to decide for them after death
  • are in an excluded group

When the law was passing through Parliament, the government agreed that the law would only apply to routine transplants, and not novel or rare transplants.

The government proposes that novel or rare transplants will still require express consent. This means you or someone representing you must explicitly give permission for your organs or tissues to be donated for novel or rare transplants. Such transplants also cover what is called Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP). This is when tissues, cells and genes are manipulated in a laboratory for treatment of a disease or injury. Some of the tissues and cells come from deceased donors.

This consultation is to ask you if the government is excluding the right organs and tissues. They would like you to answer five questions about what you think should happen.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/opt-out-organ-donation-organs-and-tissues-excluded-from-the-new-system

Dementia Drop-in Clinic

Kent and Madway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust logo

Have you or a relative been diagnosed with dementia?

Do you need more information and support?

Whether you have specific questions, or wouldjust like to pop in for a chat. No appointment is required.

Drop in between 12pm and 2pm at St. Stephen’s Health Centre on:

  • Friday 7th June 2019
  • Friday 6th September 2019
  • Friday 6th December 2019

or

  • Friday 5th April 2019 – Hamstreet Surgery
  • Friday 3rd May 2019 – New Hayesbank Surgery
  • Friday 5th July 2019 – Hamstreet Surgery
  • Friday 2nd August 2019 – New Hayesbank Surgery
  • Friday 4th October 2019 – Hamstreet Surgery
  • Friday 1st November 2019 — New Hayesbank Surgery
  • Advice on treatment, including medication and therapies
  • Support and strategies
  • Ideas to promote weilbeing and maintain activities
  • Discuss the impact of changing relationships and responsibilities
  • Signposting and information about other services available

For more information,
please ring Ashford Older Peoples‘ Service on 01233 658125

Kent and Medway
NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust

Carers Support
Ashford, Shepway and Swale

Alzheimers Society

Age UK

Tips for talking about mental health

Talking about mental health is not always easy. But starting a conversation doesn’t have to be awkward, and being there for someone can make a huge difference.

It’s important that conversations happen at times and in places that feel natural. Sometimes it’s easier to talk about our feelings when we are doing something else. Driving in the car; jogging around the park; eating breakfast in the cafe. The more typical the setting, the less unusual and uncomfortable the conversation can feel.

There is no right way to talk about mental health, but these tips will guide you to make sure you’re approaching it in a helpful way. 

1. Ask questions and listen 

Asking questions can give the person space to express how they’re feeling and what they’re going through, and it will help you to understand their experience better. Try to ask questions that are open and not leading or judgemental – such as “how does that affect you” or “what does it feel like?”

2. Think about the time & place 

Sometimes it’s easier to talk side by side rather than face to face. So, if you do talk in person, you might want to chat while you are doing something else. You could start a conversation when you’re walking, cooking or stuck in traffic. However, don’t let the search for the perfect place put you off!

3. Don’t try & fix it 

It can be hard to see someone you care about having a difficult time but try to resist the urge to offer quick fixes to what they’re going through. Learning to manage or recover from a mental health problem can be a long journey, and they’ve likely already considered lots of different tools and strategies. Just talking can be really powerful, so unless they’ve asked for advice directly, it might be best just to listen.

4. Treat them the same 

When someone has a mental health problem , they’re still the same person as they were before. And that means when a friend or loved one opens up about mental health, they don’t want to be treated any differently. If you want to support them, keep it simple. Do the things you’d normally do.

5. Be patient

No matter how hard you try, some people might not be ready to talk about what they’re going through. That’s ok – the fact that you’ve tried to talk to them about it may make it easier for them to open up another time.

And there are lots of things you can do to support them even if you’re not talking:

  • Doing things together
  • Sending a text to let them know you’re thinking of them
  • Offering to help with day-to-day tasks.

Are you hoping to start a conversation today?Read Lauren’s 5 tips for starting a conversation about mental health Read Lauren’s tips

Time To Change

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help.

Time to Change focuses on challenging stigma and discrimination in society, so they’re not able to provide individual or emergency support for people in crisis. But there are lots of people who can. They are listed here:

Samaritans

Telephone: 116 123 (24 hours a day, free to call)
Email: jo@samaritans.org
Website: www.samaritans.org

Provides confidential, non-judgemental emotional support for people experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those that could lead to suicide. You can phone, email, write a letter or in most cases talk to someone face to face.

Mind Infoline

Telephone: 0300 123 3393 (9am-6pm Monday to Friday) or text 86463
Email: info@mind.org.uk
Website: www.mind.org.uk/information-support/helplines

Mind provides confidential mental health information services.

With support and understanding, Mind enables people to make informed choices. The Infoline gives information on types of mental health problems, where to get help, drug treatments, alternative therapies and advocacy. Mind works in partnership with around 140 local Minds providing local mental health services.

Rethink Mental Illness Advice Line

Telephone: 0300 5000 927 (9.30am – 4pm Monday to Friday)
Email: online contact form
Website: http://www.rethink.org/about-us/our-mental-health-advice

Provides expert advice and information to people with mental health problems and those who care for them, as well as giving help to health professionals, employers and staff. Rethink also runs Rethink services and groups across England.

Saneline

Telephone: 0300 304 7000 (4:30pm-10:30pm)
Website: www.sane.org.uk/what_we_do/support/helpline

Saneline is a national mental health helpline providing information and support to people with mental health problems and those who support them.

The Mix

Telephone: 0808 808 4994 (11am-11pm, free to call)
Email: Helpline email form
Crisis Support: Text ‘THEMIX’ to 85258.
Website: www.themix.org.uk/get-support

The Mix provides judgement-free information and support to young people aged 13-25 on a range of issues including mental health problems. Young people can access the The Mix’s support via phone, email, webchat, peer to peer and counselling services.

ChildLine

Telephone: 0800 1111
Website: www.childline.org.uk

ChildLine is a private and confidential service for children and young people up to the age of nineteen. You can contact a ChildLine counsellor for free about anything – no problem is too big or too small. 

Elefriends

Website: http://elefriends.org.uk/

Elefriends is a supportive online community where you can be yourself. Elefriends is run by Mind. 

If you’re a carer needing support you can contact all of the above as well as Carers Directand the Carers Trust, both of whom are able to provide support and advice on any issues affecting you.

Live Well Kent

Telephone: 0800 567 7699
Email: info@livewellkent.org.uk
Website: http://livewellkent.org.uk/

Live Well Kent helps people improve their mental and physical health and wellbeing. It is a free service for anyone over 17. Live Well Kent is delivered on behalf of Kent County Council and the NHS by two charities, Porchlight and Shaw Trust.

Release the Pressure

Telephone: 0800 107 0160
Website: www.kent.gov.uk/social-care-and-health/health/release-the-pressure

Life can get really tough sometimes, but talking can help. We have a highly trained and experienced team waiting to provide you with confidential support to get you back on track.

What should I do if I’m supporting someone in a crisis?

If the person seems really unwell, and you are worried about their safety, you should encourage them to seek help.

How to support someone in crisis

Cycling is better for the environment

Cycling lowers pollution, reduces congestion, increases property pricesCycling is also much better for the environment than driving. More than a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions are produced by cars and other vehicles,6 whereas cycling is generally considered to be a zero-emissions form of transport. Even when emissions from production and maintenance of bikes are taken into account, the emissions associated with cycling are significantly lower. And if UK citizens cycled to work with the same frequency as people do in the Netherlands, for example, where more than a quarter of journeys are made by bike, carbon dioxide outputs could reduce by more than 1,500 tonnes per year.

Estimates suggest that around 12,000 premature deaths could be prevented over the next 10 years if the UK and Scottish governments meet their targets for increasing the number of journeys made on foot or by bicycle. 

Choosing to ride a bike instead of driving can also help to reduce congestion in urban areas – almost four in ten people acknowledge that many of the two-mile journeys they currently make in a car could instead be made by bike.

 

Brake, Cycling -The facts 2018

#BikeSmart

Cycling is one of the healthiest forms of transport

Cycling improves fitness, boosts brainpower, increases wellbeingCycling is one of the healthiest, cheapest and most environmentally friendly forms of transport available, with the benefits to public health, congestion and the economy widely acknowledged.

Cycling is an excellent form of exercise and can help with both weight loss and physical fitness. It also reduces the risk of serious conditions like diabetes and heart disease later in life, and can contribute to higher overall personal wellbeing. Cycling can boost brain power too, by increasing blood flow to the brain by around 30–40%.

Even cyclists in busy cities report better lung health. Riders can experience five times lower pollution levels than drivers, because air is more able to circulate around them when they are riding, compared with being stuck in a vehicle. Cyclists who use quieter routes away from busy traffic see even greater benefits.

Brake, Cycling -The facts 2018

#BikeSmart

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