Safety

Police warning following theft of unsafe toys

A trailer containing an unsafe batch of Little Tikes Squeezoo Bubble Bus and Elephant toys was stolen from Wellesbourne Distribution Park. This batch of toys was on its way to be destroyed due to quality control issues and potential safety risks associated with them.

While the brand is still stocked by reputable retailers, Detective Constable Daniel Griffiths of Warwickshire Polce said: “We’re urging people to show caution when buying these toys them from a market, car boot sale, online auction site or social media.

“This particular batch of toys were on their way to be destroyed due to quality control issues and there are potential safety risks associated with them.

“We have launched an investigation to identify the offenders and retrieve the stolen toys. I’d appeal for anyone with information that could help with our investigation to contact us.”

The stolen trailer is blue curtain sided with a red chassis with the identification number C451753. The number plate may have the partial registration WT67.

Anyone with information about the theft or who thinks they have seen the stolen toys for sale should call police on 101 quoting incident 50 of 22 November 2018.

CALL 101 – INCIDENT 50 of 22 NOVEMBER 2018.

Alternatively, information be provided anonymously to the independent charity Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

For advice and to report issues to KCC Trading Standards contact
Citizens Advice consumer service on 03454 04 05 06
Monday to Friday from 9am to 5pm.

Kent County Council Public Protection
Warwickshire Police

Junctions are dangerous for cyclists

45% of cyclist deaths occur at junctionsJunctions are another dangerous hotspot for cyclists, with collisions often occurring because drivers failed to look properly.18 Between 2011 and 2016, 45% of all cyclist deaths occurred at or near junctions, with more than half of these recorded at T-junctions. Just under a third of all cyclist deaths were recorded on roundabouts, mini-roundabouts and crossroads over the same period.

Take time to look properly before you pull out at junctions.

Turn your head to look, don’t just rely on a sideways glance.

Bikes are smaller and narrower than cars and it can take longer for our eyes and our brain to notice that they are there. Turning your head and looking for longer will help you to spot bikes and will help you to judge their speed and distance, so you can pull out safely and avoid a crash.

Always stop behind the lines at a junction.

Never drive into a bike box if the traffic light is amber or red. Riders need this space to enable them to move safely through junctions. Don’t drive or park in cycle lanes either.

Drive slowly

Give yourself time to spot danger and reactDrive slowly in places where people live

The vast majority (77%) of cyclist casualties are from incidents on roads with 30mph speed limits.15 At this speed, cars travel an average of 23 metres (or 5.75 car lengths) before stopping, and anyone hit by a car travelling at 30mph has a 20% chance of dying.

Driving more slowly will give you more time to spot danger and more time to react. It also means you can stop a lot more quickly. 20mph is the right speed in places where people live, work and play. Slow traffic makes more people want to walk and cycle in their communities.

Slow down on rural roads.

Cyclists are also vulnerable on roads outside towns and cities. In 2016, 59 cyclists died in collisions in rural areas, while 43 died in urban areas.

Many crashes involving bikes on rural roads are because drivers are travelling too fast.

Slowing down will help you to take sharp bends more safely and you will be more likely to spot riders in front of you. Brake

 

Brake:

  • Cycling – The facts, 2018
  • Smart drivers are Bike Smart, 2018

#BikeSmart

Bike Smart

Road Safety Week - Bike SmartFor Road Safety Week 2018, we are shouting out about the safety of those on two wheels, and encouraging everyone to be Bike Smart.

Cycling’s popularity has really taken off in the last few years and people are making longer trips on average than ever before. As well as being a fun hobby, cycling is an excellent way to stay fit and commute short distances, and it’s much better for the environment than many other forms of transport. However, cyclists are also one of the most vulnerable groups of people on our roads, and despite efforts to improve safety, the number of cyclists killed or injured has remained shockingly high for the last 15 years.

KMFRA Survey and Council Tax consultation

Safety and wellbeing plan update 2018

Kent and Medway Fire and Rescue Authority

Chairman’s introduction

Chairman KMFRAThis year we wanted to take the opportunity to give local people an update on the work we do and the range of services we provide. Please take a few minutes to read the information below, or look at the infographic on this page (use the Zoom link to see a much larger version) and fill this short survey and consultation* about next year’s Council Tax.

As customers and taxpayers, we always aim to provide you with value for money and the best service we can. Though thankfully I know that many of you have never needed to call on us in a crisis, I hope you are reassured that we will always be there when you need us.

Like everyone in the public sector, finances are tight, but we have managed to make significant savings of around £26m since 2010, much of which has been re-invested in our frontline service. We also work closely with police, ambulance, Kent County Council, Medway Council and others to share expertise and resources and deliver efficient services to keep the public safe.

The Home Office inspection team will be here in the New Year and we expect to hear the outcome of that in 2019. If you want to read more about our work and plans please have a look at our Customer and corporate plan and you can also sign up to email alerts about incidents in your area or to get safety advice.

Nick Chard
Chairman – Kent and Medway Fire and Rescue Authority (more…)

Stay safe in your home

It’s Gas Safety Week! Find out how to stay safe in your home with these top tips:

  • Only use a Gas Safe registered engineer to fit, fix and service your appliances. You can find and check an engineer at GasSafeRegister.co.uk (check out our graphic below) or call 0800 408 5500.
  • Check both sides of your engineer’s Gas Safe Register ID card. Make sure they are qualified for the work you need doing. You can find this information on the back of the card.
  • Have all your gas appliances regularly serviced and safety checked every year. If you rent your home ask for a copy of the landlord’s current Gas Safety Record.
  • Know the six signs of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning – headaches, dizziness, breathlessness, nausea, collapse and loss of consciousness. Unsafe gas appliances can put you at risk of CO poisoning, gas leaks, fires and explosions.
  • Check gas appliances for warning signs that they are not working properly e.g. lazy yellow flames instead of crisp blue ones, black marks or stains on or around the appliance and too much condensation in the room.
  • Fit an audible carbon monoxide alarm. This will alert you if there is carbon monoxide in your home.

Dirty chimneys cause fires – keep it swept

As the weather starts to cool down, you might be thinking of lighting your open fire, wood  burning stove or other ‘real flame’ appliance and using your chimney again.  An open fire or stove can be a focal point in your home but if they’re not properly maintained and regularly cleaned they can dramatically increase your risk of having a fire.

Dirty chimneys cause fires – keep it swept

  • Have your chimney and flue inspected and swept at least once a year for coal and twice if you are burning logs.
  • A clean chimney can help prevent fires and structural damage to your property.
  • Regular cleaning of your chimney or flues will eliminate the build up of soot and clear obstructions such as loose bricks, bird or animal nests, leaves and debris.
  • Avoid overloading the grate or build fires too high.
  • Dispose of ash safely and appropriately.
  • Be aware of the risks of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Things you can do:

    • Check for moss or grass growing out of your chimney – it’s a sign it needs repair and if you had a chimney fire, could lead to smoke spread in your property.
    • Does your chimney lean to one side? Or is the top of it missing? Some damage may not be noticeable because it is located inside the chimney. However that damage could allow a chimney fire to spread into the roof or other parts of your home
    • If there are missing or cracked mortar joints or bricks, this is a sign your chimney needs repair. Look out for crumbling mortar falling onto your fireplace or stove.
  • Only burn suitable fuels and don’t overload the grate.
  • Always use a fire guard and if you have pets or young children consider using a safety guard.
  • Make sure that the fire is out before going to bed at night or leaving the house.
  • Do not dry or air clothes on a fireguard or close to the fire.
  • Regularly check for smoke from defective brickwork in the loft when the fire is alight and avoid storing items too close to the chimney stack.
  • Make sure no sparks or fumes can escape through cracks or broken bricks.
  • Never interrupt the air supply by blocking air vents or air bricks.
  • Avoid too much clutter being stored in your loft as this will make it much easier for a chimney fire to spread.
  • Have working smoke alarms fitted on every floor of your home and test them regularly.

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