Transport

Road Closures – Arlington

Kent County Council gives notice that Arlington, Ashford will be dosed to through traffic, on or after Wednesday 2 January 2019 for up to 3 days.

Arlington will be closed in various phases along its length. Access to the remainder of Arlington continues from either direction up to where the road is closed at any time. Access to the various side-roads will be maintained from one or other direction as signposted on site.

It is planned that the road will be dosed between 07:30 hours and
16:30 hours each day.

The closures are to enable Kent County Council to carry out urgent
essential carriageway repairs.

This Notice applies when the relevant signs and barriers are on site
and is valid for a period of no more than 5 days.

M20 Closures January 2019

As part of the improvement works for the construction of junction 10a scheme, a new motorway gyratory is being built over the M20. This gyratory will comprise of two bridges otherwise known as the East and West Interchange Bridges. The steel beams for the interchanges are to be installed in January 2019.

In order to complete the installation of the steel beams, full weekend closures are required. The planned closures can be found in the table below:

Activity Start of Closure End of Closure  (M20 J9 -11 and J11 – J10 reopens)
Placing of steel beams for East Interchange Bridge Friday 11 January – 22:00 Monday 14 January – 06:00
Contingency weekend – if original weekend unachievable – East Interchange Bridge. Friday 18 January – 22:00 Monday 21 January – 06:00
Placing of steel beams for West Interchange Bridge Friday 25 January – 22:00 Monday 28 January – 06:00
Contingency weekend – if original weekend unachievable – West Interchange Bridge. Friday 4 February – 22:00 Monday 7 February – 06:00

Market path bridge lighting

Kent County Council

We have sent an email to Cllr. Dara Farrell, 
KCC Ashford South Division, ABC Victoria Ward

We have been complaining for over a year regarding the poor/lack of lighting on the footbridge between Victoria Road and Elwick Place. KCC Highway’s solution is to, this morning, close the steps to the bridge; I was told because there have been accidents on the steps. Whilst this may protect KCC against claims, it does not resolve the issue of lighting on the bridge itself. It is totally unsatisfactory, that the claimed access issue has not been resolved during the time for which this issue has existed.

Please could you press KCC Highways to resolve this issue.

cc.
Cllr Mike Whiting, KCC Cabinet Member for Planning, Highways, Transport and Waste
Cllr Charles Suddards, ABC Victoria Ward,
Cllr Brad Bradford, ABC Portfolio Holder for Health, Parking & Community Safety
Cllr Paul Bartlett, ABC Joint Transportation Board Chairman

A2070 Closures 10 December

As part of the improvement works for the construction of junction 10a, a roundabout is being built in preparation for a dual carriageway link road between the new junction 10a and the A2070.

In order to complete the construction of the new roundabout a number of overnight road closures are required

Start of Closure End of Closure – A2070 reopens
10 December 22:00 (Monday) 06:00 on 11 December
11 December 22:00 (Tuesday) 06:00 on 12 December
12 December 22:00 (Wednesday) 06:00 on 13 December
13 December 22:00 (Thursday) 06:00 on 14 December
14 December 22:00 (Friday) 06:00 on 15 December

Please find attached a letter with additional details for the overnight road closures.

I hope this information is helpful and we apologise in advance for any inconvenience these works may cause. If you have any questions please contact us by visiting our scheme webpage at
www.highwaysengland.co.uk/M20J10a,
email a member of our Project Team at M20J10AImprovements@highwaysengland.co.uk
or call our 24 Hour Customer Contact Centre
on 0300 123 5000 for further information.

Junctions are dangerous for cyclists

45% of cyclist deaths occur at junctionsJunctions are another dangerous hotspot for cyclists, with collisions often occurring because drivers failed to look properly.18 Between 2011 and 2016, 45% of all cyclist deaths occurred at or near junctions, with more than half of these recorded at T-junctions. Just under a third of all cyclist deaths were recorded on roundabouts, mini-roundabouts and crossroads over the same period.

Take time to look properly before you pull out at junctions.

Turn your head to look, don’t just rely on a sideways glance.

Bikes are smaller and narrower than cars and it can take longer for our eyes and our brain to notice that they are there. Turning your head and looking for longer will help you to spot bikes and will help you to judge their speed and distance, so you can pull out safely and avoid a crash.

Always stop behind the lines at a junction.

Never drive into a bike box if the traffic light is amber or red. Riders need this space to enable them to move safely through junctions. Don’t drive or park in cycle lanes either.

Cycling is better for the environment

Cycling lowers pollution, reduces congestion, increases property pricesCycling is also much better for the environment than driving. More than a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions are produced by cars and other vehicles,6 whereas cycling is generally considered to be a zero-emissions form of transport. Even when emissions from production and maintenance of bikes are taken into account, the emissions associated with cycling are significantly lower. And if UK citizens cycled to work with the same frequency as people do in the Netherlands, for example, where more than a quarter of journeys are made by bike, carbon dioxide outputs could reduce by more than 1,500 tonnes per year.

Estimates suggest that around 12,000 premature deaths could be prevented over the next 10 years if the UK and Scottish governments meet their targets for increasing the number of journeys made on foot or by bicycle. 

Choosing to ride a bike instead of driving can also help to reduce congestion in urban areas – almost four in ten people acknowledge that many of the two-mile journeys they currently make in a car could instead be made by bike.

 

Brake, Cycling -The facts 2018

#BikeSmart

Drive slowly

Give yourself time to spot danger and reactDrive slowly in places where people live

The vast majority (77%) of cyclist casualties are from incidents on roads with 30mph speed limits.15 At this speed, cars travel an average of 23 metres (or 5.75 car lengths) before stopping, and anyone hit by a car travelling at 30mph has a 20% chance of dying.

Driving more slowly will give you more time to spot danger and more time to react. It also means you can stop a lot more quickly. 20mph is the right speed in places where people live, work and play. Slow traffic makes more people want to walk and cycle in their communities.

Slow down on rural roads.

Cyclists are also vulnerable on roads outside towns and cities. In 2016, 59 cyclists died in collisions in rural areas, while 43 died in urban areas.

Many crashes involving bikes on rural roads are because drivers are travelling too fast.

Slowing down will help you to take sharp bends more safely and you will be more likely to spot riders in front of you. Brake

 

Brake:

  • Cycling – The facts, 2018
  • Smart drivers are Bike Smart, 2018

#BikeSmart