Wellbeing

Kent Police want to hear from you

Kent Police would like to hear your experiences and interactions with the police or a family member as a result of a mental health crisis.

To help improve the services and future learning, share a summary of how the police responded to the crisis. All information provided will be anonymous.

If you would like to share your experiences, email Melinda Ghirardi Melinda.Ghirardi@kent.pnn.police.uk or call 01622 652643 by Friday 14th July. Help make a difference today!

If you have any experiences you would like to share, good or bad, talk to Healthwatch Kent.
You can

call the Healthwatch Kent freephone on 0808 801 01 02,

click https://kent.healthwatchcrm.co.uk/your-views, or

email info@healthwatchkent.co.uk.

Healthwatch Kent 10 July 2017
www.healthwatchkent.co.uk/news/kent-police-want-hear-you

New mental health and eating disorders services

Ashford Clinical Commissioning GroupFrom 1 September 2017, people of any age in east Kent with an eating disorder, and children and young people who need specialist mental healthcare, will get more joined-up services.

This is because contracts for a new all-age eating disorders service in Kent and Medway and an innovative children and young people’s mental health service in Kent have been awarded to the same organisation: NHS trust NELFT.

Currently, different trusts provide different aspects of the service, and there is no separate specialist service for people with eating disorders: it is part of wider mental health services.

Although the contracts were awarded separately, NELFT won both of them after being judged best for quality and value for money by each of the teams involved, who included GPs and mental health specialists. All the Kent services provided by NELFT will be based locally.

Children, young people and families with experience of mental health problems, and teenagers and adults with experience of eating disorders played a key role in the process, including setting out what they expect from the new service. (more…)

KCC Strategy for Adults with Autism

Kent County Council (KCC) is launching its strategy for adults with autism on Tuesday, July 11 which sets out its future commitments and priorities.

In 2010, Government set out a requirement for all local authorities to have a strategy as described in the National Autism Strategy.

Across Kent, approximately over 13,000 individuals are living with autism and current estimates suggest over half these will have autism in the absence of a learning disability.  This strategy addresses these individuals.

The launch event will be chaired by Anne Tidmarsh, KCC Director for Older People and Physical Disability and will include an introduction by Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care, Graham Gibbens.

KCC Cabinet Member for Adult Social Care, Graham Gibbens, said:

“In Kent, we want to continue to ensure that adults with autism are able to live their lives free from the risk of discrimination, hate crime and abuse.

“This strategy outlines our core principles, and our vision for how we can ensure that individuals are able to live fulfilling and rewarding lives.”

Director of Older People and Physical Disability, Anne Tidmarsh, said:

“Since the announcement by Government in 2010, we have taken time in developing services for this group including a specialist social care team, diagnostic service and commissioning peer support groups.

“We are now pleased to welcome a strategy that addresses the needs of adults with autism which assesses the current situation and looks at future priorities and commitments.”

For further information about the strategy and any queries, please email SensoryandAutism@kent.gov.uk to learn more.

Kent County Council 28 June 2017
https://kccmediahub.net/kcc-launches-strategy-adults-autism745

KCC Older Persons Wellbeing Consultation

Kent County CouncilOlder Persons and People Living with Dementia Wellbeing Core Offer

Kent County Council

Opens: 12 Jun 2017
Closes: 23 Jul 2017

Kent County Council is developing a new model for the Wellbeing Core Offer of Services for Older Persons and People Living with Dementa.  The offer seeks to improve people’s wellbeing and support them to live as independently as possible.

Kent County Council (KCC) wants to hear your views on the proposal to ensure that the new model meets the needs of Kent residents and delivers the outcomes which are most important to them.

In designing the new model, KCC is proposing to end annual grants which fund older persons and dementia community and voluntary sector services and re-invest the funding in a new contract. The proposed contract will create a more joined up pathway for supporting people to live well, will be delivered through a Strategic Partner approach and will be in place for 5-7 years. (more…)

Mental Health Awareness Week

This Mental Health Awareness Week, we have reproduced tips from the Mental Health Foundations on how to thrive with good mental health. You can find out more about the Mental Health Foundations theme of Thriving or Surviving from the Mental Health Awareness Week page on its website www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week.

They also have more information and advice on how to look after your mental health www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help.

Samaritans

Telephone: 116 123 (24 hours a day, free to call)
Email:jo@samaritans.org
Website:www.samaritans.org

Provides confidential, non-judgmental emotional support for people experiencing feelings of distress or despair, including those that could lead to suicide. You can phone, email, write a letter or in most cases talk to someone face to face.

Mind Infoline

Telephone: 0300 123 3393 (9am-6pm Monday to Friday)
Email:info@mind.org.uk
Web site:www.mind.org.uk/help/advice_lines

Mind provides confidential mental health information services.

With support and understanding, Mind enables people to make informed choices. The Infoline gives information on types of mental distress, where to get help, drug treatments, alternative therapies and advocacy. Mind has around 140 local Minds providing local mental health services.

Rethink Mental Illness Advice Line

Telephone: 0300 5000 927   (10am-2pm Monday to Friday)
Email:info@rethink.org
Website:http://www.rethink.org/about-us/our-mental-health-advice

Provides expert advice and information to people with mental health problems and those who care for them, as well as giving help to health professionals, employers and staff. Rethink also runs Rethink services and groups across England and Northern Ireland.

Saneline

Telephone: 0300 304 7000 (6pm-11pm)
Website:www.sane.org.uk/what_we_do/support/helpline

Saneline is a national mental health helpline providing information and support to people with mental health problems and those who support them.

ChildLine

Telephone: 0800 1111
Email:http://www.childline.org.uk/Talk/Pages/Email.aspx
Website:www.childline.org.uk

ChildLine is a private and confidential service for children and young people up to the age of nineteen. You can contact a ChildLine counsellor for free about anything – no problem is too big or too small.

Elefriends

Website:http://elefriends.org.uk/

Elefriends is a supportive online community where you can be yourself. Elefriends is run by Mind.

If you’re a carer needing support you can contact all of the above as well as Carers Direct and the Princess Royal Trust for Carers, both of whom are able to provide support and advice on any issues affecting you.

Live Well Kent

Telephone: 0800 567 7699
Email: info@livewellkent.org.uk
Website: http://livewellkent.org.uk/

Live Well Kent helps people improve their mental and physical health and wellbeing. It is a free service for anyone over 17. Live Well Kent is delivered on behalf of Kent County Council and the NHS by two charities, Porchlight and Shaw Trust.

Release the Pressure

Telephone: 0800 107 0160
Website: www.kent.gov.uk/social-care-and-health/health/release-the-pressure

Life can get really tough sometimes, but talking can help. We have a highly trained and experienced team waiting to provide you with confidential support to get you back on track.

(more…)

Care for others

Caring for others is often an important part of keeping up relationships with people close to you. It can even bring you closer together.

Why not share your skills more widely by volunteering for a local charity? Helping out can make us feel needed and valued and that boosts our self-esteem.

It also helps us see the world from another angle. That can help to put our own problems in perspective.

Find out more about volunteering at www.do-it.org.uk.

Caring for a pet can improve your wellbeing too. The bond between you and your pet can be as strong as between people. Looking after a pet can bring structure to your day and act as a link to other people. Lots of people make friends by chatting to fellow dog walkers.

Mental Health Foundation
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/looking-after-your-mental-health/care-others

#MHAW17
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

More information

Ashford Volunteer Centre provides local volunteering opportunities and volunteer training
www.ashfordvc.org.uk/

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help. https://southashford.org.uk/index.php/2017/02/02/time-to-talk/#support

Accept who you are

Some of us make people laugh, some are good at maths, others cook fantastic meals. Some of us share our lifestyle with the people who live close to us, others live very differently.

We’re all different. It’s much healthier to accept that you’re unique than to wish you were more like someone else.

Feeling good about yourself boosts your confidence to learn new skills, visit new places and make new friends.

Good self-esteem helps you cope when life takes a difficult turn.

Be proud of who you are. Recognise and accept what you are not good at, but focus on what you can do well.

Work out if there’s anything about yourself that you still want to change. Are your expectations realistic? If they are, work towards the change in small steps.

Mental Health Foundation
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/looking-after-your-mental-health/accept-who-you-are

#MHAW17
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help. https://southashford.org.uk/index.php/2017/02/02/time-to-talk/#support

Do something you’re good at

What do you love doing? What activities can you lose yourself in? What did you love doing in the past?

Enjoying yourself helps beat stress. Doing an activity you enjoy probably means you’re good at it and achieving something boosts your self-esteem.

Concentrating on a hobby like gardening or the crossword can help you forget your worries for a while and change your mood.

It can be good to have an interest where you’re not seen as someone’s mum or dad, partner or employee. You’re just you.

An hour of sketching lets you express yourself creatively. A morning on the football pitch gets you active and gives you the chance to meet new people.

Mental Health Foundation
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/looking-after-your-mental-health/do-something-youre-good

#MHAW17
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help. https://southashford.org.uk/index.php/2017/02/02/time-to-talk/#support

 

Take a break

A change of scene or a change of pace is good for your mental health.

It could be a five-minute pause from cleaning your kitchen, a half-hour lunch break at work, or a weekend exploring somewhere new. A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Give yourself some ‘me time’.

A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Give yourself some ‘me time’.

Taking a break may mean being very active. It may mean not doing very much at all.

Take a deep breath… and relax. Try yoga or meditation, or just putting your feet up.

Listen to your body. If you’re really tired, give yourself time to sleep. Without good sleep, our mental health suffers and our concentration goes downhill. Sometimes the world can wait.

Mental Health Foundation
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/looking-after-your-mental-health/take-break

#MHAW17
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help. https://southashford.org.uk/index.php/2017/02/02/time-to-talk/#support

Ask for help

None of us are superhuman. We all sometimes get tired or overwhelmed by how we feel or when things go wrong. If things are getting too much for you and you feel you can’t cope, ask for help.

Your family or friends may be able to offer practical help or a listening ear. Local services are there to help you.

For example, you could:

  • join a support group like Weight Watchers or Alcoholics Anonymous to help you make changes to your life
  • find a counsellor to help you deal with your feelings or make a fresh start
  • call the council about noise nuisance
  • visit a Citizens Advice Bureau if you want advice on debt.

Your GP may be able to refer you to a counsellor. You should consider getting help from your GP if difficult feelings are:

  • stopping you getting on with life
  • having a big impact on the people you live or work with
  • affecting your mood over several weeks.

Over a third of visits to GPs are about mental health. Your GP may suggest ways you or your family can help you. Or they may refer you to a specialist or another part of the health service.

Mental Health Foundation
https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/your-mental-health/looking-after-your-mental-health/ask-help

#MHAW17
#timetotalk
www.mentalhealth.org.uk/campaigns/mental-health-awareness-week

More advice

Citizens Advice

Call Adviceline on 0300 330 1313 if you want to speak to someone about your debts.

or can visit:

Ashford Borough Citizens Advice Bureau

Seabrooke House
Church Road
ASHFORD
Kent
TN23 1RD

01233 626185
answerphone/call back/live line

Monday to Friday 09.30 – 16.00
Appointments: 09.30-11.30
Drop in no appointment needed.
Last face to face appointment 11.30

Mental health help and support services

If you’re experiencing mental health problems or need urgent support, there are lots of places you can go to for help. https://southashford.org.uk/index.php/2017/02/02/time-to-talk/#support