News

16 and beyond: Earn as you learn

Kent Choices - a guide to your futureYour future. It’s your choice.

You need to stay in education or training after you’re 16, but how you do this is up to you. There are lots of options and you need to pick the one that will help you get the future you want.

Earn as you learn

Apprenticeships and self employment

If you have a career sector or path in mind and want to start earning money as you learn, an apprenticeship could be for you. You’ll do real jobs for real employers; training on the job, working towards an industry-standard qualification.

Find out more about what’s available and how to apply at Apprentice Kent.

Some providers who offer apprenticeships also offer Study Learning Programmes for people aged 16 to 19. These include areas like catering, construction and hairdressing. To find out more visit the Kent Association of Training Organisations (KATO) website or talk to your careers teacher.

Working for yourself

If you like the idea of setting your own hours, working when and where you want, and you have an idea that might make money, you could speak to the Kent Foundation about getting your business idea off the ground. The Kent Foundation offer free business support to young people who want to start or grow a business, and they could help you bring your business ideas to life.

Remember that until you’re 18, you’ll need to be in learning or training as well as developing your business.

Kent County Council
www.kent.gov.uk/education-and-children/college-sixth-form-employment-and-training/options-at-16-and-beyond#tab-2

The case for change: older people

The number of people
over the age of 70 will rise
by 20% in the next 5 years

We all want health and social care services that can meet our needs now and in the future.  However, health, social and public health services face new challenges that mean they need to change the way hey work to improve care and get better value for the money that is available.

Find out more about the Case for Change and the emerging Sustainability and Transformation plan that will set out the strategy for dealing with the challenges that face health, social and public health services visit:

Transforming health and social care in Kent and Medway website
http://kentandmedway.nhs.uk/ and

Better health and care in east Kent website
http://eastkent.nhs.uk/

#KMlistens

The case for change: long term conditions

More people have long-term conditions

like diabetes, lung and heart disease

We all want health and social care services that can meet our needs now and in the future.  However, health, social and public health services face new challenges that mean they need to change the way hey work to improve care and get better value for the money that is available.

To find out more about the Case for Change and the emerging Sustainability and Transformation plan that will set out the strategy for dealing with the challenges that face health, social and public health services visit:

Transforming health and social care in Kent and Medway website
http://kentandmedway.nhs.uk/ and

Better health and care in east Kent website
http://eastkent.nhs.uk/

#KMlistens

16 and beyond: Learn full time

Kent Choices - a guide to your futureYour future. It’s your choice.

You need to stay in education or training after you’re 16, but how you do this is up to you. There are lots of options and you need to pick the one that will help you get the future you want.

Learn full time

Stay on full-time at school or college

Lots of school have sixth forms. You can stay at your current school or move to a new one. Sixth forms tend to be smaller, and offer more teaching structure and student support than colleges.

Colleges are often larger and more informal than sixth forms, and they offer a wider variety of courses, but they will expect you to be able to manage your own work and time effectively.

If you’re not sure which is right for you, some schools run joint courses with colleges so you can experience both.

You need to find a school or college that offers the courses or subjects you are interested in studying, or the best route to the level of qualifications you want. If you have special educational needs, you’ll also want to think about whether your chosen provider is suitable for your situation.

Search and apply for courses through UCAS Progress

Open days

Schools and colleges have open days that you can go along to and find out more about what’s offered and get a feel for the place.

Find open days in your local area

Kent County Council
www.kent.gov.uk/education-and-children/college-sixth-form-employment-and-training/options-at-16-and-beyond#tab-1

 

The case for change: population

Our population is growing

About 1.8 million people live in Kent and Medway.

By 2031 this number will increase by almost a quarter, compared to 2011

We all want health and social care services that can meet our needs now and in the future.  However, health, social and public health services face new challenges that mean they need to change the way hey work to improve care and get better value for the money that is available.

Find out more about the Case for Change and the emerging Sustainability and Transformation plan that will set out the strategy for dealing with the challenges that face health, social and public health services visit:

Transforming health and social care in Kent and Medway website
http://kentandmedway.nhs.uk/ and

Better health and care in east Kent website
http://eastkent.nhs.uk/

#KMlistens

HLF Funding for Victoria Park

Hubert FountainA bid by Ashford Borough Council (ABC) has led to the award of £ 167,000, as the first stage of a proposal for £ 3.2 million, from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Big Lottery Fund England’s Parks for People programme. The funds will be used toward the development stage of the Council’s Victoria Park and Watercess Fields Masterplan.

Chris Dixon,  Arts and Cultural Industry Manager at ABC, commented to South Ashford Community Forum, when the application was submitted, “The priority for the programme is to conserve the existing heritage of the designated park, intending to make a significant difference to heritage, people and communities in the area. It is a two stage application process. The first stage is to develop a more detailed second round proposal. We are at the very earliest point, with no confirmed detailed plans, but have an ambition to:

  • refurbish the Hubert fountain and piazza;
  • reintroduce or recognise lost cultural and natural heritage elements;
  • provide a volunteers compound and other community facilities; and
  • put in place a range of community events and activities including a new ‘Friends Group’ etc.

The award follows the signing of a number of Section 106 agreements that allocate nearly £ 470,000, due to be paid on occupation of local developments.

Norman Road closure

Kent County CouncilWhen we plan to carry out the work and how long it will take:

This is to let you know that, as part of the on-going maintenance and improvement of the highway network, Kent County Council will be strengthening and resurfacing the circulatory of the roundabout and approaches at the junction with Gallagher Retail Park/ B&Q access Rd

The work will take 3 nights to complete, between 28th July 2017 and 1st Aug 2017 (excluding the weekend). All work will be between the hours of 7.30pm and 5am. This type of work can be affected by bad weather, so if it is not possible for us to carry it out at this time, we will arrange a new date and let you know via a letter drop to your home. We will also put up signs along the road, before we start, showing the date we plan to start work.

What we plan to do:

  • We will remove some of the existing road surface by a method known as milling. The complete area will then be swept by a mechanical sweeper to ensure the prepared surface is clean and free of dust and debris.
  • If required, the existing manhole covers or rain water gully gratings will be adjusted or replaced to the correct level before the new surface is laid. Please note that this operation is noisy and can be prolonged as it is carried out using pneumatic hand tools.
  • The new surfacing material will then be laid using a machine called a paver and compacted with a roller. This is a relatively quick process and dependant on the design will either be a one or two layer process.
  • Finally, following completion of the surfacing, all associated high friction surfacing and road markings will be re-painted.
  • The road will then be re-opened.

Please note that during the whole process, audible warning reversing sirens will be heard; this is a health and safety requirement and cannot be turned off but will be kept to a minimum.

How you can help

During these essential works, it will be necessary to close Norman Road, between the junction with Beaver Road and Romney Marsh Road so that we can carry out the works safely for both the workforce and road users. There will be limited access via the diversion route to Gallagher Retail Park and B & Q. An alternative diversion route for traffic will be signed whilst the road is closed. The diversion route for through traffic along Norman Road will be Beaver Road, Kingsnorth Road/ Wotton Rd/ Malcolm Sargent Rd / A2042 Romney Marsh Road. The footways will remain open at all times and pedestrian access to businesses and residential properties will be available.
It is inevitable that residents and businesses near the works will experience some disruption and we apologise in advance for any inconvenience caused, but we will try to keep this to a minimum. Access to properties will need to be restricted for a short period while work is carried out in front of each property and across road junctions. If you have any particular access needs, please let the workforce on the site know.

We need your help to make sure the work is done as quickly as possible and to the best possible quality. If your vehicle is usually parked on the carriageway, please make sure you park it somewhere else away from the site whilst the works are carried out, so the road is clear for us to resurface.

If you need more information, please call us on 03000 418181

You can also visit our website www.kent.gov.uk/highways to find out how we look after the roads throughout

Kent or report any faults you find on our roads.

For your safety and the safety of our workforce, please drive carefully and slowly through the road works.

Kent County Council 10 July 2017

Grantley Close closure

Kent County CouncilRoad closed 17th July for up to 4 days to allow KCC Highways to carry out urgent carriageway repairs. The road will be closed for the entire length. There is no alternative route as the road is a cul-de-sac. Every effort will be made to maintain access for residents whenever it is safe to do so. It is planned that the road will be closed between 07:00 hours and 17:00 hours each day. Please allow extra time for your journey.

Severity: Medium

Category: Carriageway works

Incident time: 17 July 2017 07:00
Completion time: 21 July 2017 17:00:00

Kent County Council 10 July 2017 10:20
http://www.kenttraffic.info/?sid=KCC170710_20&E=600458&N=141537&lyt=planned

Copycat Websites

Copycat websites are those which offer services from government departments or local government, but are not the official site and charge an often substantial premium for those services, often with no tangible benefit to the customer. They achieve this by using website tools to achieve high positions in search engines such as Google, often ranking them higher than the official site and making it appear as though they are ‘official’ or ‘authorised’. They also have website addresses designed to confuse with the official site, and often feature a similar look and feel and brand design.

Google does not allow promotion of firms which charge fees for services that are free from an official site, yet the copycat sites persist. They are meant to prominently display that the service they are offering is available free of charge or for a lower fee, but this often displayed in small type at the bottom of the page, or not at all. At least one government agency has taken action with the Advertising Standards Authority against sites which have copied their official logo and branding.

Get started…

Always be sure that you are using the official website, as copycat sites can occupy many of the top listings on your search engine page and end up costing you unnecessary money.

The Risks

  • Being misled into paying excessive prices for official services which can be purchased on the government department or local government site at the correct price. These services include:
    • Passports.
    • Birth and death certificates.
    • Fishing licences.
    • Driving licences.
    • Driving tests.
    • Congestion Charge.
    • European Health Insurance Cards (EHIC).
  • Being told that using copycat sites make a particular process or application faster or easier, when in fact you could do it yourself equally quickly and easily.

Searching and Buying Official Services Safely

  • Do not automatically opt to use the first website(s) you find in a search engine, even if the address seems authentic and you are in a hurry.
  • Instead, take time to look for the official website. You can normally tell that site is official if it ends in ‘.gov.uk’, it has the department, agency or council’s authentic logo and contact details and the prices are cheaper.
  • If you do opt to use an unofficial site to purchase official services, make sure that the payment page is secure by checking that the address begins with ‘https://’ (the ‘s’ is short for ‘secure’) and there is a locked padlock in the browser window.

If you think you have been misled into overpaying by using an unofficial site:

  • Contact the site to insist on a refund, saying you think you were misled.
  • Contact the relevant government department or agency or local government organisation and report the copycat site.

#scamaware

Get Safe Online
https://www.getsafeonline.org/shopping-banking/copycat-websites/

A new study by Kent County Council’s Road Safety Team has found that a third of drivers in the county use their mobile phones while driving, including texting or accessing social networks, despite knowing it is dangerous and illegal.

2015 research has found that:

  • 59% of drivers admitted that mobile phones were a distraction to drivers
  • 33% of those aged under 35 admitted to using their phone whilst driving to text or access apps
  • 21% of all drivers admitted to using their phone whilst driving to text or access apps
  • 37% of those aged under 35 admitted to taking a hand-held call whilst driving
  • 27% of all drivers admitted to taking a hand-held call whilst driving

With research indicating that some individuals find it acceptable to use their mobile phone and drive, this campaign seeks to remind drivers that using phones, either hand-held or hands free whilst driving, places them and other road users in unnecessary and avoidable danger.

No matter what information you’re getting from your phone, nothing is worth risking your own life and the lives of those around you. It really can wait.

Kent County Council
www.kentroadsafety.info/mobiles/